About


Escalating worldwide fuel prices and environmental concerns are helping to dramatically increase the demand for clean alternatives. It has become a global imperative that we break our addiction to oil. Providing for the ever increasing energy needs of the planet is going to take a wide range of alternate energy sources and green technologies are finally beginning to establish themselves in the energy mix.....a sector expected to grow tenfold within several years. The future is bright for renewable energy sources and a more sustainable world.



Archives

01 May - 31 May 2010
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2010
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2010
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2010
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2009
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2009
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2009
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2009
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2009
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2009
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2009
01 May - 31 May 2009
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2009
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2009
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2009
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2009
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2008
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2008
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2008
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2008
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2008
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2008
01 May - 31 May 2008
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2008
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2008
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2008
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2008
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2007
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2007
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2007
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2007
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2007

Links

Daily Alternative Energy News Updates
News Groups
Forum
News Archives 1/02-8/07

Alternative Energy Sizing Calculators

Tag Key Word News Search

Search!

Last Comments

lokimikoj (Vermont tailpipe …): Hi all! Cool!.. Nice w…
hiutopor (Vermont tailpipe …): Hello Very interesting…
Emil Möller (Vermont tailpipe …): Very well indeed. Also …
Emil Möller (Vermont tailpipe …): Very well indeed. Re tim…
Rob Rieber (USDA global confe…): It's good that we're invo…
Emil Möller (When the oil drie…): Energy transition is inev…


weblog_text - RSS-XML - ()

XML: RSS Feed 
XML: Atom Feed 

« Obama's gambit to mar… | Home | Building a Continenta… »

Last chance for climate change legislation?

29 04 10 - 20:41 Last chance for climate change legislation?


By Brad Knickerbocker,


It's crunch time for climate change legislation on Capitol Hill, and the bill to be introduced Monday could be the last chance for passage before lawmakers face voters this fall.

The bill coauthored by Sens. John Kerry (D) of Massachusetts, Lindsey Graham (R) of South Carolina, and Joseph Lieberman (I) of Connecticut has as its main goal a 17 percent reduction in US greenhouse gas emissions (mainly carbon dioxide) from 2005 levels in 10 years and 80 percent by 2050.

It has easier requirements on emissions caps for power plants and other major contributors of greenhouse gases - easier than previous legislative proposals. It also has incentives to build new nuclear power plants. There are also provisions for offshore oil drilling.

The measure pleases no one entirely. But many environmentalists see it as the most realistic option given the current political climate. And it's been endorsed by the Edison Electric Institute (which represents the nation's largest power producers) as well as three major oil companies - Shell Oil Co., BP and ConocoPhillips.

Still, it's an uphill climb for supporters of climate change legislation - which is also a top priority for President Obama.

"Despite the fanfare that is likely to accompany the announcement, the bill is running almost two months behind schedule and has been losing political momentum for an even longer period," reports International Oil Daily, noting pressing unrelated issues as well questions about the Kerry-Graham-Lieberman bill itself. "Over the next several weeks energy legislation will have to compete for time on the Senate schedule with contentious financial reform legislation and the confirmation process for a new Supreme Court justice. The possible introduction of major immigration legislation this summer could also make it more difficult to pass climate change and energy legislation."

Among what some lawmakers see as unknowns in the bill is whether its transportation provision might amount to a tax on fuel - not a welcome prospect for anybody when economic times remain tough.

"I'd like to support it, but I have to look at it," Sen. Olympia Snowe (R) of Maine told the Washington Post, adding that she was concerned about what it would do to home heating oil and gas prices. "In this economy, we have to see how much we can do."

Then there persistent questions about the best way for individuals to do their part in reducing the effects of climate change. For example, in a six-part investigative report the Monitor concludes that buying carbon offsets may ease eco-guilt but not global warming.

But writing at Politico.com - as many Americans were celebrating Earth Day with local events focusing on climate change - Senator Kerry warned of trying to separate domestic energy needs from the longer-range goal of preventing (or at least slowing) global warming.

"In an election year, it is tempting to settle for the "energy-only" bill - then go home and declare victory," he writes. "But the stakes are too high to do less than we know we can. Workers are counting on the new jobs - now. Our troops are counting on us to break dependence on foreign oil - now. Our children and grandchildren are counting on us to address the climate threat and its effects on the planet they'll inherit - now." Used tags: , , ,
No comments yet

Trackback link:

Please enable javascript to generate a trackback url

  
Remember personal info?

Emoticons /

Comment moderation is enabled on this site. This means that your comment will not be visible on this site until it has been approved by an editor.

To prevent automated comment spam we require you to answer this silly question. Trackback spam IP's are tracked, IP range banned, blacklisted and reported, so don't waste your time.
 

  (Register your username / Log in)

Notify:
Hide email:

Small print: All html tags except <b> and <i> will be removed from your comment. You can make links by just typing the url or mail-address.



edie.net News from edie.net


edie.net News from edie.net




 

weblog_text - more - ()

Last chance for climate change legislation?

Thursday 29 April 2010 at 8:41 pm Last chance for climate change legislation?


By Brad Knickerbocker,


It's crunch time for climate change legislation on Capitol Hill, and the bill to be introduced Monday could be the last chance for passage before lawmakers face voters this fall.

The bill coauthored by Sens. John Kerry (D) of Massachusetts, Lindsey Graham (R) of South Carolina, and Joseph Lieberman (I) of Connecticut has as its main goal a 17 percent reduction in US greenhouse gas emissions (mainly carbon dioxide) from 2005 levels in 10 years and 80 percent by 2050.

It has easier requirements on emissions caps for power plants and other major contributors of greenhouse gases - easier than previous legislative proposals. It also has incentives to build new nuclear power plants. There are also provisions for offshore oil drilling.

The measure pleases no one entirely. more

Obama's gambit to marry US policies on environment and energy

Monday 19 April 2010 at 11:18 am By Mark Clayton


True, America is still guzzling fossil fuels. But since taking office just over a year ago, President Obama has quietly set the nation's energy policy on a new course.

Even as health care dominated the news, Obama energy czar Carol Browner - working with the departments of Interior, Energy, and Transportation - has established a new, unified energy-and-environment policy. But whether this focus on renewable power and energy security can succeed depends largely on whether Congress approves climate-energy legislation that puts a price on carbon emissions, energy experts say. more

Waste-hating freegans Dumpster dive for food

Sunday 18 April 2010 at 9:24 pm Waste-hating freegans Dumpster dive for food



By Megan McCourt




Washington - One night as Madeline Nelson was foraging through a Whole Foods Dumpster in Manhattan, a man gave her a look of pity and held out a dollar bill. That wasn't what she was looking for.

Nelson, 54, was searching for good-quality food that had been tossed from the store's stocks of slightly wilted produce, day-old bread and dented canned goods.

Nelson is a freegan - a mash-up of "free" and "vegan." more

Auto emissions: New greenhouse gas caps raise gas mileage standards

Friday 09 April 2010 at 03:59 am By Mark Clayton,




The nation's first-ever law requiring a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions goes into effect today, mandating that automakers progressively chop the amount of tail-pipe gases emitted from US cars.

The first cars to be affected by the law will be automakers' 2012 lines. By 2016, model year greenhouse gas emissions must not exceed an average of 8.8 ounces per mile - a 21 percent reduction from today's levels. To get there, vehicles' gas mileage will need to achieve on average 35.5 miles per gallon fleet wide - a 40 percent improvement from current levels. more

Impact of emission caps: costlier cars that will be cheaper to drive

Friday 09 April 2010 at 03:50 am By Laurent Belsie


The US government's new limits on cars' greenhouse-gas emissions represent a landmark for the environment. For consumers, they're more of a mixed bag financially.

Cars and light trucks will cost more starting in 2012. But what consumers pay up front, they'll more than make up in fuel efficiency, according to the government.

Here's how it adds up: Suppose you buy the average 2016 model, when the strictest emissions standards kick in. The extra technology needed to meet those standards will cost an average $869 for a car or $1,098 for a light truck. So your new vehicle will cost about $1,000 more than it otherwise would.

But that vehicle will be cheaper to drive. So at at average 35.5 miles per gallon, you would save enough in fuel over the first three years to make up for the extra up front cost, according to calculations by the US Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). more

A guide to choosing a solar water pump

Thursday 01 April 2010 at 12:37 pm A guide to choosing a solar water pump


AEN News




Washington - Research scientists with the Agricultural Research Service have published a guide to choosing a solar water pump for remote applications and has provided readers access to that valuable information.

For this guide, agricultural engineer Brian Vick and colleagues drew on the ARS Conservation and Production Research Laboratory's 31 years of testing stand-alone water pumps. The laboratory is located near Bushland, Texas.

Vick found that for pumps with motors rated less than 1,500 watts, solar is usually the best choice. With current technology and costs, wind power or a hybrid wind/solar pump is usually best for power needs of 1,500 watts or more. more
 

Alternate Energy Resource Network Webring

[ join now | ring list | random | << prev | next >> ]