.

Ever volatile fuel prices, security of supply, renewable energy cost reductions and environmental-climate concerns are dramatically accelerating the demand for greener alternatives.

It has become a global imperative that we break our addiction to fossil fuels. Providing for the ever increasing energy and transportation needs of the planet is going to take a wide range of alternative energy sources, cleaner fuels, the smart grid and advanced storage solutions.

These technologies are finally establishing themselves in the energy mix and becoming mainstream .....an emerging multi trillion dollar market rapidly becoming one of the most significant industrial sectors this century. The future is bright for renewable energy sources and a greener sustainable world.

Archives

01 Jan - 31 Jan 2019
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2011
01 May - 31 May 2011
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2011
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2011
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2011
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2010
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2010
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2010
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2010
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2010
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2010
01 May - 31 May 2010
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2010
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2010
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2010
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2009
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2009
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2009
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2009
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2009
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2009
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2009
01 May - 31 May 2009
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2009
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2009
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2009
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2009
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2008
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2008
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2008
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2008
01 Jul - 31 Jul 2008
01 Jun - 30 Jun 2008
01 May - 31 May 2008
01 Apr - 30 Apr 2008
01 Mar - 31 Mar 2008
01 Feb - 28 Feb 2008
01 Jan - 31 Jan 2008
01 Dec - 31 Dec 2007
01 Nov - 30 Nov 2007
01 Oct - 31 Oct 2007
01 Sep - 30 Sep 2007
01 Aug - 31 Aug 2007







Links

Daily Alternative Energy News Updates
Recent Videos

Alternative Energy Sizing Calculators

Tag Key Word News Search

Article Archives

Last Comments


weblog_text - RSS-XML - ()

XML: RSS Feed 
XML: Atom Feed 

« New rays of hope for … | Home | Exploring Scientific … »

Cars Of The Future: What To Expect

13 09 08 - 15:15 Cars Of The Future: What To Expect





by Jim Barbaresso





Traffic tie-ups and fender benders may one day be a thing of the past thanks to Intelligent Transportation Systems.

ITS is intended to make us a more mobile nation and a safer one. Like the creation of our Interstate Highway System more than 50 years ago, ITS will have a dramatic impact on our country’s transportation challenges and opportunities.

Today, traffic congestion and highway safety are serious problems that affect our quality of life and our economy. The average motorist spends nearly a week stuck in traffic each year. That’s time that could be spent with family and friends or being more productive at work. More than 42,000 people are killed in traffic accidents and hundreds of thousands more are injured each year. The impacts on our society are staggering. In the future, cars will be equipped with all kinds of advanced sensors, computer processors, on-board displays and communications systems. In essence, the car will become part of an integrated network of connected vehicles and roadways.

Features we might expect:

· Cars that warn drivers about unsafe conditions, imminent collisions and excessive curve speeds.

· Dashboard screens with preloaded debit cards to pay tolls electronically, order meals at the next restaurant or download a movie for the kids to watch in the backseat.

· Vibrating seats alerting you that you’re veering onto the shoulder or falling asleep.

Imagine approaching an intersection and getting a warning when someone is about to run a red light. Or if there is an accident up ahead, getting real-time information alerting you to the incident and providing alternate routes.

This technology is being developed and tested across the country, in places like California, Florida, New York, Michigan and a number of other states.

Some advanced applications, such as navigation systems, lane departure warnings and backup cameras, are already deployed on higher-end automobiles. Within the next decade, these technologies and others will be installed in most vehicles.

Unfortunately, this timeline could be lengthened by rising fuel costs. Most of the revenue for transportation improvements comes from the gas tax. As fuel consumption decreases, revenue for roads also decreases.

Yet the adoption of these technologies will allow us to move away from reliance on the gas tax and toward a more equitable mileage-based user fee. Ultimately, this can help us restore our economy and global competitiveness.

In the next federal highway funding bill, due in 2009, we must look at ways to reinvent how we fund and deliver transportation projects and services. ITS certainly can be part of the solution.

Jim Barbaresso is national director of intelligent transportation systems for HNTB Corporation, which works with many state departments of transportation as well as the USDOT to design, develop and deploy technology to reduce congestion and improve safety on America’s roads, bridges, tunnels and highways. Used tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Trackback link:

Please enable javascript to generate a trackback url






 

weblog_text - more - ()

Big Help in Biofuels Research

Monday 29 September 2008 at 02:52 am Big Help in Biofuels Research


Washington - A short little grass known as purple false brome may speed discoveries about switchgrass, its famous cousin and energy-crop hopeful.

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists like John Vogel and Yong Gu at the agency's Western Regional Research Center in Albany, Calif., are probing the genetic makeup of purple false brome, or Brachypodium distachyon, as a faster way to learn more about the genes inside switchgrass. more

Precedent-setting carbon auction Thursday

Monday 29 September 2008 at 02:43 am By Mark Clayton


For almost as long as people have worried about global warming, economists have called for taxing carbon emissions. As long as sending CO2 skyward was cost-free, they argued, the practice would continue.

Starting Sept. 25, for the first time in US history, a price tag will begin to be placed on millions of tons of carbon dioxide spewing from every major power plant from Maine to Maryland.

Just what that price will be won't be known until after Thursday's computerized auction of about 12.5 million tons of "carbon allowances," essentially permission slips to pollute.

Utility companies will bid on the allowances. They may be used, saved, or traded so that any company with a need to send more CO2 up the stack can buy more - at the market price. The amount of CO2 to be cut over the next decade is modest - about 18 million tons annually (US power plants collectively emit about 2.8 billion tons of CO2 yearly). But the auction and process of setting a price for carbon are critical first steps, many say. more

Dispelling The “Twisted Truths” Of Energy-Saving Light Bulbs

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 5:18 pm Dispelling The “Twisted Truths” Of Energy-Saving Light Bulbs







For more than 129 years, people have used the incandescent light bulb as the primary light source for the home. With more consumers searching for products that are good for the environment, a new light bulb is revolutionizing lighting around the world. Energy-saving compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) have become the symbol of the “green” movement. They use 75 percent less energy and last as much as 10 times longer than traditional incandescent light bulbs. Plus, they help reduce carbon dioxide emissions linked to global warming. more

Campaign Plants Trees At Schools Across The U.S.

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 5:08 pm Campaign Plants Trees At Schools Across The U.S.






Schools are generally seen as the place to plant the seeds of knowledge. Yet thanks to a one-day environmental campaign, schools and parks across the country became places to plant something a little greener.

Sixteen schools across the country, from Long Island to Hawaii, participated in the initial “Trees for Success” campaign, with more than 800 trees planted in schools and neighboring parks in a single day. The schools were selected by the Arbor Day Foundation out of more than 200 applications based on need, civic and local support, student involvement, a plan for upkeep, and location. more

Wind Power Is Poised To Support U.S. Jobs

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 4:50 pm Wind Power Is Poised To Support U.S. Jobs

The U.S. Department of Energy contends that wind power can provide 20 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030.

Experts say there is a renewable source of energy that is capable of becoming a major contributor to America’s electricity supply over the next three decades--wind power.

In 2007, wind was already one of the fastest-growing sources of electricity in U.S. households, and the U.S. Department of Energy contends that wind power can provide 20 percent of the nation’s electricity by 2030 and be a critical part of the solution to global warming. more

Weathering Rising Costs With Free Program

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 4:41 pm Weathering Rising Costs With Free Program





AEN News




Spiking energy costs are prompting many Americans to find ways to conserve energy.

Escalating energy costs have affected low-income Americans the most, says a recent study by the National Energy Assistance Directors' Association, forcing them to cut staples such as food and medicine. more

Algae-To-Energy Tests Planned

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 4:23 pm Algae-To-Energy Tests Planned



AEN News




For decades, scientists and energy executives have sought to unlock the energy potential of algae. Best known as the green pond scum that befouls rivers, lakes and streams, the single-celled plants are also a potentially prolific source of renewable fuels that could be used to power engines in cars, trucks, generators and many other machines.

Because algae use carbon dioxide to grow and reproduce, releasing oxygen in the process, systems that use them to produce renewable biofuel supplies are also being eyed for their promise in reducing carbon dioxide emissions from power plants and other sources generally believed to promote global warming.

Despite the promise of this approach in a world searching for renewable alternatives to limited fossil fuel supplies, attempts to develop algae-derived biofuels in commercially viable volumes have not been successful.

Now, that could be changing. more

Female Scientists Work To Make Breakthroughs

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 4:00 pm Female Scientists Work To Make Breakthroughs


AEN News





One woman, Dr. Laura Lapham at Florida State University, is studying possible new energy sources at the bottom of the sea. Another woman, Dr. Sandra Ugrina at the University of Maryland, is developing ways to make the next generation of aircraft more fuel efficient by reducing the drag on their wings. And still another, Dr. Sridevi Vedula Sarma at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is investigating ways to improve treatments for Parkinson’s disease. more

Creating Sustainable, Alternative Fuels

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 3:43 pm Creating Sustainable, Alternative Fuels




AEN News





With rising oil prices and dwindling natural resources, scientists are working harder than ever to develop viable alternative fuels that can support America’s--and the world’s--energy needs.

Yet the solution is not as simple as it seems, since it generally takes power to make power. For example, grain-based biofuels, such as ethanol, require a “feedstock” from which to derive energy. But using corn and other grains as feedstock means they’re not available as food--a tricky situation when millions of people don’t have enough to eat, due to grain-based biofuel’s potential effect on worldwide food supplies.

Fortunately, there are other biofuel sources that are now being put into play. more

Exploring Scientific Ways To Save The Planet

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 3:30 pm Exploring Scientific Ways To Save The Planet



AEN News




According to many experts, global warming is the greatest crisis that mankind has ever faced. And as the planet heads toward disaster, decisive action is needed.

Some of the world’s finest brains have been drawing up plans--radical scientists with revolutionary ideas. Yet putting these ideas into action requires epic experiments on a massive scale, in search of a solution that could change the future of our world. more

Cars Of The Future: What To Expect

Saturday 13 September 2008 at 3:15 pm Cars Of The Future: What To Expect





by Jim Barbaresso





Traffic tie-ups and fender benders may one day be a thing of the past thanks to Intelligent Transportation Systems.

ITS is intended to make us a more mobile nation and a safer one. Like the creation of our Interstate Highway System more than 50 years ago, ITS will have a dramatic impact on our country’s transportation challenges and opportunities.

Today, traffic congestion and highway safety are serious problems that affect our quality of life and our economy. The average motorist spends nearly a week stuck in traffic each year. That’s time that could be spent with family and friends or being more productive at work. More than 42,000 people are killed in traffic accidents and hundreds of thousands more are injured each year. The impacts on our society are staggering. more